SERVICES

Complementary Therapy

 

Treatments will complement (ie ‘work alongside’) conventional medicine.

 

                      With thanks for therapy definitions:​

-Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC)

                     -British Acupuncture Council

-Craniosacral Therapy Association

These days conventional western medicine and complementary therapies often work well together to the benefit of the client. In recent times, conventional medicine has widened its scope of understanding and practice to include a more holistic approach to diagnosis and treatment. Equally many complementary therapies incorporate a scientific understanding of anatomy, physiology and psychology. However the skills of complementary therapists  are used alongside and are never intended to replace diagnosis and treatment by conventional medicine. All Munro therapists recognise this and comply carefully with the guidelines and codes of conduct – not only of Munro Health – but also of their various specialist governing bodies.

The core belief shared by Munro therapists is that the whole person should be evaluated and treated holistically and with respect.

Munro Health has had over 20 years experience of helping clients to find a more comfortable and helpful state of physical and spiritual wellbeing. The holistic approach to treatment traces its roots back into antiquity, including Greece and the Far East. 

ACUPUNCTURE

Acupuncture is one of the longest established forms of healthcare in the world. Acupuncturists are trained to use subtle diagnostic techniques that have been developed and refined for thousands of years. The focus is on you as an individual, not your illness, and all symptoms are seen in relation to each other. Each patient is unique; two people with the same western diagnosis may well receive different acupuncture treatments.  Treatment involves the insertion of very fine needles into specific points on the body to affect the flow of your body’s qi, or vital energy.

MASSAGE

In all types of massage therapy, the intention is to relax the soft tissues, increase delivery of blood and oxygen to the massaged areas, warm them, and help the body to relax.

In a typical massage therapy session, the practitioner will discuss symptoms, medical history and the desired results. The practitioner generally performs some evaluation through touch before beginning the massage. Oil or powder help reduce friction on the skin and the therapist may use other aids, such as ice, heat, fragrances, or machines.

Massage may be found to bring relief from everyday aches, reduce stress, increase relaxation, address feelings of anxiety and tension, and aid general wellness. It can also be used in support of other therapies to assist in the rehabilitation of muscular injuries.

AROMATHERAPY

Aromatherapy is the therapeutic use of essential oils to help deal with everyday stresses and emotional well-being. Essential oils, extracted from plants, are thought to possess distinctive properties, which may be used to improve overall emotional and spiritual health imbuing the user with a sense of relaxation and calmness.

In a typical aromatherapy session, the aromatherapist will ask questions about previous medical history, general health, wellbeing and lifestyle. This helps the practitioner to choose and blend the safest and most appropriate essential oils for the individual. The oils may be applied in combination with massage or the aromatherapist may suggest other methods.

Aromatherapy may be found to be helpful to those wanting to reduce everyday stress and so help with the ability to cope, relax and sleep. As well as being used in individual therapy sessions and at home, it is also used in a variety of settings, including hospitals and hospices.

REFLEXOLOGY

Reflexology is a complementary therapy based on the belief that there are reflex areas in the feet and hands which are believed to correspond to all organs and parts of the body. Some practitioners may also include work on points found in the face and ears. Reflexology works on an individual basis and may alleviate and improve symptoms such as everyday stress and tension.

During a typical reflexology session the reflexologist will take a detailed medical history. Sessions are usually performed in a comfortable chair or couch. If it is to be performed on the feet, the client will be asked to remove footwear and socks but other forms of reflexology require no removal of clothing. The practitioner will make a visual and tactile examination of the area to be worked before beginning the precise reflexology massage movements. The particular types of movements involved require the application of an appropriate pressure using the thumb and fingers.

Reflexology can be a wonderfully relaxing experience where you can take time out from everyday pressures. The therapist’s expert touch will help you relax which can help improve mood, aid sleep and relieve tension. The result is an overall sense of wellbeing.

CRANIO SACRAL THERAPY

Craniosacral therapy is practised around the world and continues to develop in
popularity for a wide range of people. It is a gentle but potent way of working
with the body using light touch. CST works with the whole person, of which the
cranium, spine and sacrum are the core, and changes may occur in body, mind
and spirit during and after sessions.
The practitioner works with holding and supporting at various places in the
body, always checking with the client about what is comfortable and
acceptable; there is no manipulation.
CST supports your body’s innate ability to balance, restore and heal itself, as
well as helping to reduce stress and build your underlying energy.

SHIATSU

Shiatsu is a touch based therapy that applies pressure to areas of the surface of the body through loose comfortable clothing for the purpose of promoting and maintaining wellbeing. A Shiatsu practitioner will initially consult with the client and plan the Shiatsu treatment. The client will then be positioned comfortably, with appropriate adjustments being made throughout the session. Clear and accurate aftercare advice will be given. Shiatsu is a Japanese word that literally means finger pressure and derives its theoretical and practical roots from the ancient traditions of Oriental medicine.

Today it is an autonomous treatment method influenced by Chinese, Japanese and Western knowledge. In addition to being regularly used by thousands of people all over the world, a variety of charities, health foundations, NHS trusts and hospitals in the United Kingdom provide Shiatsu to support patients whilst receiving treatment for a range of health issues and to help them maintain their general wellbeing.

Munro Health T/A. Munro Health Ltd. is a registered charity in England, No. 1118955 and a company registration, No. 04540756.
Address: Office 4, Canalside House. 383 Ladbroke Grove, London W10 5AA.
P: 02089696799  M: 07422972142  Email: munrohealthcoop@yahoo.co.uk 
Designed by Nazan Garcia.  ©2020 Munro Health